Universal Children’s Day

It was the 30th of July 2017 when I woke up to the beautiful sun streaming through the huge corner window – 6 a.m. in Lahore Pakistan. I gazed through the window. On the other side of the adjacent 7-foot brick wall, topped with barbed wire, were children playing in an empty lot. There was a boy and a girl who looked like they were 8 years old. They walked out onto the rough land, hand in hand laughing, when another little girl showed up – maybe their sister? She looked about 3 years old. No shoes. They all wanted to play – they found some garbage – some plastic – then together started playing with it. They put it onto the ground, crouched over it – oops! It flew away! They then found another piece of material. As I sat mesmerized with this scene I thought about the children who are “blessed” with being born into a wealthy family, who are constantly being stimulated with TV, the computer, or some other technology – would they be able to keep themselves occupied like these children? Would they be able to find happiness in such seemingly poor conditions?

Children want to play with one another, to appreciate a friendship and to share their experiences. Children living in similar conditions described above reside throughout the world; not just in the emerging or underdeveloped worlds. In Canada, children of all economic levels sit side-by-side in their classes. They quickly learn that all peers help to improve their own understanding of the world, and that they need each other for growth and enjoyment. Often the greater the disparity, the more the children learn from each other. Children who have very little material objects in their lives, can be stimulated in a different way, which could develop a uniquely different ingenuity.  When children are given a chance to work as a diverse team to solve a question that initially looks like it is impossible to solve, humility is learned, and so is the acceptance of others.

In December 1954, the General Assembly of the United Nations declared that all countries observe Universal Children’s Day on November 20th to remember the adoption of the Declaration of the Rights of the Child. This declaration sets out children’s rights to life, health, education, to play, to family life, and to be protected from violence, not to be discriminated and to have their views heard. The UN asked all countries to observe this as a day of worldwide fraternity and understanding between children.

We often work in “bubbles” of similar people and expose our children to the same “bubbles”. During the month of November, I encourage everyone to take one day to observe as Universal Children’s day, and to share it with their children by venturing outside the “bubbles”

Let’s work together to increase the understanding between children globally.

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